WRITING + art, people, life

 

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A couple Thursdays ago I gave a talk at ETSU about art writing, which was also my first time doing anything like that. Thankfully I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about this subject so I had plenty to say and organization of the overall lecture came fairly easily.

In my own experience as a writer and an artist, I have noticed there are a lot of overlapping characteristics between the two roles. To make the prospect of writing about art more approachable, I thought using a known frenemy for illumination would be helpful. 

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1. There’s no substitution for doing the work — Exactly how it sounds. If you’re not in your studio working, you can’t hope to make improvements as an artist and the same goes for writing.
2. Self-motivation is necessary — No one cares if you stop writing or making art once you graduate, except for maybe a handful of people who love you. It takes time and diligence to keep yourself going.
3. Seemingly unrelated assignments can get you closer to your goals / interests — I like how Neil Gaiman described this necessity when talking about the early part of his career:

Sometimes the way to do what you hope to do will be clear cut, and sometimes  it will be almost impossible to decide whether or not you are doing the correct thing, because you’ll have to balance your goals and hopes with feeding yourself, paying debts, finding work, settling for what you can get.

Something that worked for me was imagining that where I wanted to be – an author, primarily of fiction, making good books, making good comics and supporting myself through my words – was a mountain. A distant mountain. My goal.

And I knew that as long as I kept walking towards the mountain I would be all right. And when I truly was not sure what to do, I could stop, and think about whether it was taking me towards or away from the mountain.

4. Opportunities are sought, but also created — Opportunities exist for artists in a lot of different forms, such as juried exhibitions, exhibition proposals, grant proposals, etc. but there is also some creative problem solving required. Once we’ve made the work, how do we share it with people? How can we take steps toward our respective mountains?

I used Vision magazine, a student-run independent art publication in existence between 2007-2010 at ETSU, as an example. Robert Prowse, at the time a communications major who was friends with a lot of art students, recognized a deficit in art writing and exposure. Since he had experience selling advertisements for the East Tennessean, had taken some journalism courses and had connections with writers as well as artists, he was able to pull together strengths in various individuals (especially Ben Townsend Hamm, the art director of the magazine) to create a product that benefited many.

I wrote a few feature articles on students that they later used when applying to grad schools, which I also used when applying for writing jobs. When Jennifer Culp took over as editor, she was later able to use that experience for editorial and writing jobs. Some students learned about interviewing or reviewing subjects, other students learned about being interviewed and seeing their work discussed publicly in print.  It was a support structure that was needed and created within the community. No one gave them permission to do it or handed them the tools.

5. Communication with a known and (hopefully) unknown audience — Bouncing off of the above point, well, even good things that people love can fall apart. One of the primary reasons that Vision didn’t survive was because it kept speaking to and pooling resources from it’s known audience. Students are by default a transient demographic. Narrower still are the fine or studio art students.

During my talk I quoted Scott Contreras-Koterbay’s article, Elephants As Free Radicals, on Dennis McNett’s visit to ETSU  —

“I find myself often thinking at art world events that the only people who are there already approve of what’s being done; rarely do outsiders find their way into an art event, intimidated by the cliquishness of the community. Art that is for the art community merely speaks to the converted…”

Something I did not anticipate needing to do in regard to this talk was tricking artists and art students into caring about it. If we cannot stand to communicate or see ourselves translated for an audience, how can we possibly hope for anyone else to care? And if we only intend to speak to ourselves, to the converted, then what exactly is the point?

6. Engagement = Growth

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I ended my talk with two examples of how intentional and unintentional engagement with my community, which always involves some degree of willful vulnerability, stimulated questions, discussion, and growth. One worked out really well and the other did not.

When you’re writing about art and allowing it to exist within a larger context, it’s complexity and connections within vast territories grows. When you’re writing about art, you should be writing about people and life.

Drawings @ PROJEXxFest

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Beginning with a few bands and some art at PROJEXx Studio & Gallery (109 W Walnut St) and ending at Mecca (117 Spring St) with more music! This event is free and open to the public, though donations would definitely be appreciated. Couch change, loose bills, whatever. Bring it. (By the way, I don’t get any of the money. I just want to encourage support of local venues.)

In case you can’t read that tiny text at the top, the event is Saturday, April 13th at 8 PM.

I will have some drawings (honestly not sure how many or which drawings yet) up in the show, and I’m glad that I can be part of this because I have really enjoyed PROJEXx and its on-again, off-again affair with Johnson City. It has exposed me to people and things happening in this town that I was completely oblivious to previously. For that, I am really grateful.

Sunday Morning: Slocumb Holiday Art Sale

No reading in bed this morning. I had to set up my table at the Slocumb Galleries Holiday Art Sale + Silent Auction, which features the work of many local artists and art student organizations on ETSU campus. The sale is up from December 3rd – 13th, with a reception occurring on December 6th, I believe.

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My table has an assortment of Christmas cards, gift tags, gift bags, prints, and paintings. I still have a lot to learn and refine, obviously, but this has been a definite improvement. I have signs! And everything is clearly priced! And there’s kind of a display! As long as I look semi-human instead of like some weird muppet trying to sell cards with baby Jesus on them, I’m doing well in my mind.

People often ask me what the cards and prints/paintings are to me, as in, “Is this your artwork now? Or are you just doing this for money?”

First of all, I like working in a lot of different mediums and there are a lot of different aesthetic sensibilities that appeal to me. I enjoy really graphic, bold prints as well as delicate, hand-stitched embroidery pieces. Aggressive, rough mixed media paintings and finely rendered, tight paintings. If I try to confine myself, I start to feel like that awful girl in The Exorcist. (I won’t even link to it. Will not.) If making posters and flyers and so forth was good enough for Toulouse-Lautrec, Picasso, Picabia, and many, many other great artists, it’s good enough for me.

Although I do make these items with selling them in mind (unlike my other work), I don’t believe they are less a product of my personality, interests, and training than that other more “serious” work. It’s not as easy as it may sound to design and print a really good card. Designing things according to a certain set of values and aesthetic for an audience is a challenge every time you attempt it. Literally every time I make some new items available, I learn something valuable about the exchange. For example, I recently had a sale in which no one bought anything, and I think that’s because I failed to really consider my audience’s sensibilities. The work was good, but it didn’t fit well enough into the audience’s sense of themselves. They weren’t interested. Put the work in another environment and it sells really well.

If nothing else, making these printed materials and quick paintings and stencils keeps me working and anyone that has stopped working for any significant duration of time has thought, ‘If only I had been working on something!’ But I always come away with more than that.

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Find the pickle

I forgot to take pictures yesterday. Since I had to go back today to put my cards into clusters, I took some photos quickly:









I also have a lot of prints available and a few original paintings. While I was there preparing the cards it became obvious that people thought my work (which took up three tables) was done by three different artists. They talked to me about my cards, then moved on and commented to each other about the rest of the work as if it wasn’t mine. I can see why they would think that, but I also see a thread connecting all of the work. Or rather, a tangle of many threads. It’s not surprising. Just interesting to me.

Santa Cat knows when you’re awake

I’ve been spinning for weeks. Literally. It’s exhausting, but finally I fell over. I fell over right into a pile of red ribbons, clippings of pine and rosemary, sparkling silver glass as thin as paper, pomegranate seeds, and ridiculous Santa costumes for dogs.

You know what this means. There’s bound to be a craft-oriented holiday sale. I’ve been preparing for it, that is whenever I’m not busy convincing myself to go hide under every blanket that I own. Long dramatic story. For now, I’m just updating to say there’s a Holiday Art Sale going on at ETSU in the Culp Center, which I am excited about.




More pictures tomorrow. After I’ve slept.

Reception for Inheritance

I’m not sure how one gauges the success of a reception. Is it how many people show up? How many people compliment you? How much art is purchased? How many people suggest another exhibition or commission that probably won’t come to fruition? I don’t know.

A lot of people showed up, a lot of people responded positively to the work, a lot of people loved the food, and one person bought a print. Good, I think. I worked a bit harder to promote the show and to allow other people to promote it for me. A couple people mentioned reading about it in the paper to Robert.

Thanks to my grandparents, mom, mother-in-law, and some friends the food for the reception was everything I hoped it would be — good, seasonal, and substantial vegan food for people who aren’t used to eating vegan food. I’m glad I decided to shoot for having too much food because people ate pretty much all of it. There was very little left for us to take home by the end of the night. We had:

Southern Event Regulation sweet tea
Art Show Regulation boxed wine (probably not vegan)
Husband Regulation Yuengling lager beer
Fruit jam, olive & dill, garlic, and spicy nut spreads
Chipotle, black bean, and garlic hummus
Crackers and fresh bread
Fresh fruit
BBQ pomegranate tempeh
Citrus glazed beets & sweet potato
Asparagus & heirloom tomato garlic salad
Cranberry, apple & squash quinoa
Hot black-eyed peas & kale
Sesame chard salad
Spiced pumpkin cupcakes
Maple cookies (Earth Fare)
No-bake chocolate cookies
Peanut butter rice krispy treats

It was all delicious. And I might have forgotten something or things. We managed to find some compostable plates and silverware, plus recyclable plastic cups so there ended up being one trash bag, one recycling bag, and two compost bags. I’m pretty pleased with hosting an event that was at least semi-responsible.

Instead of a guestbook, I decided to paint a rectangle on the wall and let people fill it with their comments. More like an open forum or a discussion board than a guestbook. People were a bit shy about it, but with some encouragement by the end of the night there were several comments, some of which were especially thought-provoking or validating. (And who doesn’t love feeling validated?) It seems like most people came to me directly to tell me what they think.

We ended up staying in the gallery until 11:30 because people kept coming in, and I was as proud of myself for talking to so many strangers as I was for putting together the whole damn show. Especially on three hours of sleep. More images from the reception are available at my Flickr account. I’ll take some good photos of the work itself soon. Until then, here are a few more images from the reception:

Things to know:

Sue Coe Lectures at ETSU:

Thursday, March 25th at 7:00 p.m. in room 112 of Brown Hall.

http://www.graphicwitness.org/coe/enter.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sue_Coe

http://wiki.provisionslibrary.org/wiki/index.php/Sue_Coe

Big Mary
She Can't Catch Up, 1998.
Untitled, 2004.
Feedlot, 1991.
Dog Food, 1988.

Megan Levacy is having a  reception for her MFA thesis exhibition Eulogy at the Reece Museum from 5:00 to 6:30 p.m.

Field Sparrow

For more information:

http://meganlevacy.com/

http://www.etsu.edu/reece/

Also, the Cherokee Carvers exhibition is still going on at the Reece Museum in another gallery if you haven’t see it yet.

Tomorrow, Friday, March 18th receptions will be held for two more graduating ETSU students Slocumb Galleries — Laken Bridges’ Manifestation and Charlie Haskins and The Rain Dogs’ A Matter of Taste. The reception will go from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m.

Flight. Laken Bridges.

A Matter of Taste exhibition card.

Things to know:

James Elkins Lectures at ETSU:
(text taken from Facebook event page)

Lecture #1: Monday, February 21, 2011, 7:00 p.m., 127 Ball Hall
“How to Use Your Eyes, and How Some Animals Use Their Eyes”
Exercises in seeing and the relevance of animal vision for understanding human vision.

Lecture #2: Tuesday, February 22, 2011, 7:00 p.m., 127 Ball Hall
“The Concepts of Empathy and Sympathy”
A philosophic paper on absorption, immersion, theatricality, self-awareness, and other related concepts in contemporary art theory.

James Elkins grew up in Ithaca, New York. He received the BA degree from Cornell (English and Art History). He received a graduate degree in painting, and then switched to Art History, got another graduate degree, and went on to do the PhD in Art History (all from the University of Chicago). He is currently E.C. Chadbourne Chair in the Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

His writing focuses on the history and theory of images in art, science, and nature. Some of his books are exclusively on fine art (What Painting Is, Why Are Our Pictures Puzzles?). Others include scientific and non-art images, writing systems, and archaeology (The Domain of Images, On Pictures and the Words That Fail Them), and some are about natural history (How to Use Your Eyes). Current projects include a series called the Stone Summer Theory Institutes, a book called The Project of Painting: 1900-2000, a series called Theories of Modernism and Postmodernism in the Visual Art, and a book written against Camera Lucida.

Sponsored by the Mary B. Martin School of the Arts and the Department of Art and Design.